How about some some martial arts to strike your morning into shape? Filipino martial arts group Eskabo Daan will show off their wicked fast moves on the front steps for our FREE Filipino American History Month Celebration on Sunday, Oct 5.

Learn about the history of Filipino martial arts (did you know a woman created it?) while marveling at foot, stick, hand, and knife work.

You’ll inevitably work up some energy from watching Eskabo Daan, so head into the museum afterwards and burn it off with a day of fun festivities.

Learn more about FilAm Day here.

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Sunday, October 5th is the 5th Annual Filipino American History Month Celebration! This year’s theme “Tulay” (bridge), represents a link between multiple generations and two countries that bring a broader perspective to the Filipino American community’s contribution to the Bay Area’s arts and culture.

Enter Samsung Hall in style and grace by joining us for the Sacred Space Ceremony procession. From the front steps of the museum, the sounds and movements of the Philippines will guide you into Samsung Hall. Join other Filipino enthusiasts to bridge the ancient to the modern—all in the spirit of “tulay”.

Did you know every first Sunday of the month is a Target Free Day? Did you also know that October 5th is the first Sunday of the month? Score!

For a full schedule of events, click here.
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Who was Bernice Bing? Activist, artist, lesbian, Asian American and more. Spend an afternoon getting to know this Bay Area icon through the documentary film The Worlds of Bernice Bing this Sunday, September 28. 

After the screening, join award-winning director Madeleine Lim for a Q&A sesh as well as a panel discussion with locals Tina Takemoto, Kim Anno, Thao Nguyen and Malik Seneferu.

Click here for more info.
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Thank you Asian American Women Artists Association,
Asia Society and Center for Asian American Media

singhstreetstyle:

The new face of Samsung.

Pardeep Singh Bahra, The founder of Singh Street Style.

Be your own label.

Hi ho everyone! Today we celebrate the birthday of Jim Henson, beloved by many for his creativity and innovation that still continues to captivate all ages. He is best known for Sesame Street and The Muppets. We’d like to tip our hat with a joyous “wakah wakah” and our own Kermit-colored puppet. This green gangling guy is made of wood, cloth and mixed media; he’s from Burma, circa 1950-1980. If you try hard enough, you can almost hear him singing Kermit the Frog’s signature song, “Bein’ Green”.

Take a look at our sizeable collection of puppets on our website here. Use the keyword “puppets” (in the right side column’s search box) and off you go!

Check out this face. Is it cute? Creepy? Charming? Curious? All of the above?
This Filipino limestone jar probably once contained human bones. It was discovered in a cave in Cotabato province, Mindanao around the year 600. The rather small size of the jar indicates that the bodies of the deceased had decomposed before the bones were placed within it. A tradition of jar burials existed in the Philippines from the early Neolithic period, and continues in the same parts of Southeast Asia to the present day.
Visit the museum on Sunday, Oct 5 for our FREE Filipino American History Month Celebration. For a grand total of $0 (Thanks to Target), you can join us for Fil-Am Day AND roam our permanent galleries.

Share our Fil-Am Day event on Facebook.
Check out the complete schedule of events here.
Wanna learn more about this burial urn? Check it out here.

Check out this face. Is it cute? Creepy? Charming? Curious? All of the above?

This Filipino limestone jar probably once contained human bones. It was discovered in a cave in Cotabato province, Mindanao around the year 600. The rather small size of the jar indicates that the bodies of the deceased had decomposed before the bones were placed within it. A tradition of jar burials existed in the Philippines from the early Neolithic period, and continues in the same parts of Southeast Asia to the present day.

Visit the museum on Sunday, Oct 5 for our FREE Filipino American History Month Celebration. For a grand total of $0 (Thanks to Target), you can join us for Fil-Am Day AND roam our permanent galleries.

Share our Fil-Am Day event on Facebook.

Check out the complete schedule of events here.

Wanna learn more about this burial urn? Check it out here.

boyishdivision:

a kid went to the Museum of Modern Art and this was their amazing experience they wrote on a visiters card

MoMA has mad game. 

It’s World Rhino Day. I know you love rhinos. We do too, and we even have our own special rhino here in the museum. The fact that it has two horns suggests that it is a Sumatran rhinoceros from Southeast Asia. The smallest (and sometimes hairiest!) in the family, there are fewer than 400 thought to exist, making it one of the rarest largest mammals in the world. Yikes. Our rhino is a Chinese bronze vessel from 1100–1050 BCE. Back in the day (we’re talkin’ Shang Dynasty), ceremonial vessels were cast from a standard set of shape with richly decorated surfaces. In contrast, our rhino is shown in its natural form with no adornments on its “skin”. Perhaps Director Jay Xu’s favorite piece in our permanent collection, this vessel is a beautiful example of craftsmanship and it’s definitely a masterpiece. While we’re on the topic of World Rhino Day, we wanted to give you a heads up about some exciting news on the horizon. A few hints:1) It involves…yup, you guessed it, rhinos 2) Kids and parents alike will be stoked3) We’ll need your helpUnfortunately, we can’t divulge all the details, but keep your eyes peeled. XO.To learn more about our rhinoceros vessel, click here. It’s World Rhino Day. I know you love rhinos. We do too, and we even have our own special rhino here in the museum. The fact that it has two horns suggests that it is a Sumatran rhinoceros from Southeast Asia. The smallest (and sometimes hairiest!) in the family, there are fewer than 400 thought to exist, making it one of the rarest largest mammals in the world. Yikes. Our rhino is a Chinese bronze vessel from 1100–1050 BCE. Back in the day (we’re talkin’ Shang Dynasty), ceremonial vessels were cast from a standard set of shape with richly decorated surfaces. In contrast, our rhino is shown in its natural form with no adornments on its “skin”. Perhaps Director Jay Xu’s favorite piece in our permanent collection, this vessel is a beautiful example of craftsmanship and it’s definitely a masterpiece. While we’re on the topic of World Rhino Day, we wanted to give you a heads up about some exciting news on the horizon. A few hints:1) It involves…yup, you guessed it, rhinos 2) Kids and parents alike will be stoked3) We’ll need your helpUnfortunately, we can’t divulge all the details, but keep your eyes peeled. XO.To learn more about our rhinoceros vessel, click here.

It’s World Rhino Day. I know you love rhinos. We do too, and we even have our own special rhino here in the museum. The fact that it has two horns suggests that it is a Sumatran rhinoceros from Southeast Asia. The smallest (and sometimes hairiest!) in the family, there are fewer than 400 thought to exist, making it one of the rarest largest mammals in the world. Yikes. 

Our rhino is a Chinese bronze vessel from 1100–1050 BCE. Back in the day (we’re talkin’ Shang Dynasty), ceremonial vessels were cast from a standard set of shape with richly decorated surfaces. In contrast, our rhino is shown in its natural form with no adornments on its “skin”. Perhaps Director Jay Xu’s favorite piece in our permanent collection, this vessel is a beautiful example of craftsmanship and it’s definitely a masterpiece. While we’re on the topic of World Rhino Day, we wanted to give you a heads up about some exciting news on the horizon. A few hints:

1) It involves…yup, you guessed it, rhinos 
2) Kids and parents alike will be stoked
3) We’ll need your help

Unfortunately, we can’t divulge all the details, but keep your eyes peeled. XO.

To learn more about our rhinoceros vessel, click here.

beben-eleben:

How to get a boyfriend

It’s time to slake your thirst…for knowledge about World Water Monitoring Day! It’s an international program that encourages citizens to be conscious of their local water bodies.

Think of it as a worldwide ecological flash mob: everyone treks over to his or her local stream, lake, estuary or coastal water and tests the quality of the water to assess if it’s safe for swimming, fishing, drinking and so forth.

Speaking of water — as most of you know, Californians are very concerned with water conservation given the current severe drought. In an effort to take care of our precious Hetch Hetchy H2O (sweet, sweet nectar), we have launched a mini campaign inside the museum! Look for signage like this near sinks and water fountains.